Archive for the 'Archive' Category

ARTifacts – A Day Without Art 25 Years Ago

Memorial Wall in front of the Flora Court entrance for A Day Without Art, 1989

Memorial Wall in front of the Flora Court entrance for A Day Without Art, 1989

On December 1, 1989, the second annual World AIDS Day (a global public health campaign initiated by the World Health Organization), the DMA participated in A Day Without Art: A National Day of Action and Mourning in Response to the AIDS Crisis.

Visual AIDS, an organization of art professionals committed to facilitating AIDS-related exhibitions and events, conceived A Day Without Art as a call to arts organizations to recognize the effect of AIDS on the art community.

The aims of the day were to 1) commemorate losses of artists and arts professionals; 2) create greater awareness about the spread of AIDS; 3) publicize the needs of people with AIDS; and 4) call for greater funding of services and research.

Flyer for A Day Without Art activities

Flyer for A Day Without Art activities at the DMA

The DMA worked with five Dallas-area artists to determine the most appropriate program for A Day Without Art. Lead artist Greg Metz, in collaboration with Pam Dougherty, Sean Earley, Jerry Janosco, and Brian Overley, conceived the presentation as a bleak confrontational memorial to the widespread, continuing art community deaths. It consisted of three parts.

1. The artists constructed black Memorial Walls to impede direct access to the Museum’s three public entrances. The temporary walls were installed for 24 hours, from 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 30, 1989, to 4:00 p.m. on Friday, December 1, 1989. The walls displayed white ribbons with the names of those in the Dallas art community who had died or were diagnosed with AIDS. Members of the community were invited to remember loved ones, artists, and art community members by adding their own white ribbon.

2. The evening of Thursday, November 30, featured a sound installation and performance by electronic performance artist Jerry Hunt, and donations benefiting the Dallas AIDS Resource Center were accepted.

3. An electronic counter was installed in the Concourse, marking the World AIDS Death Toll, which at the time was one death every 17 minutes.

A Day Without Art Memorial Wall at Ross Plaza entrance

A Day Without Art Memorial Wall at Ross Plaza entrance

Over 400 arts institutions responded to A Day Without Art in a variety of ways, from closing, to darkening a gallery or shrouding artworks, to sponsoring educational or remembrance programs.

Hillary Bober is the Archivist at the Dallas Museum of Art.

 

ARTifacts: Gateway to the DMA

When the DMA moved downtown, the new museum included a dedicated education space called the Gateway Gallery. The gallery was named Gateway Gallery to indicate that it was to be a gateway to understanding art and the Museum’s collection.

Director Harry S. Parker III with children in the Gateway Gallery, 1984 [Photographer: Tim Mickelson]

Director Harry S. Parker III with children in the Gateway Gallery, 1984 [Photographer: Tim Mickelson]

The first installation for the Gateway Gallery in January 1984, designed by Paul Rogers Harris, allowed visitors to explore the basic elements of art and discover how artists use those elements to create artworks.

"The Gateway Gallery Guide to The Elements of Art" brochure cover

“The Gateway Gallery Guide to The Elements of Art” brochure cover

There were activities to discover line, form, and color. Also texture:

Child exploring texture through sample materials in the Gateway Gallery, 1984

Child exploring texture through sample materials in the Gateway Gallery, 1984

And perspective:

Children explore a mirrored Room of Infinity to understand perspective [Dallas Morning News]

Children explore a mirrored Room of Infinity to understand perspective [Dallas Morning News]

The Gateway Gallery had many different installations, held special exhibitions, and put on an uncountable number of programs for a variety of audiences, a Museum tradition maintained by the Center for Creative Connections.

Hillary Bober is the Archivist at the Dallas Museum of Art.

ARTifacts: Go for the Corndogs, Stay for the Art

It’s that time of year again: the annual pilgrimage to visit Big Tex, ride the Texas Star, see some livestock, watch a show, and, perhaps most importantly, eat plenty of unique fried foods. Yes, it is time for the State Fair of Texas.

If you were attending the State Fair in the 1950s and early 60s, when the DMA was still located in Fair Park, you would also have been able to see Dallas artists showcasing their craft in the Museum’s center court. The demonstrations were in conjunction with the annual exhibitions of Texas art and artists held during the State Fair.

H. O. Kelly, 1959

H. O. Kelly, 1959

Evaline Sellors and Octavio Medellin, 1950s

Evaline Sellors and Octavio Medellin, 1950s

Shirley Lege Carpenter (jeweler) and Stella La Mond (weaver), 1961

Shirley Lege Carpenter (jeweler) and Stella La Mond (weaver), 1961

Hillary Bober is the Archivist at the Dallas Museum of Art.

ARTifacts: A Trip to the Moon and Beyond

From 1953 to 1956, the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts had something few other art museums did . . . a planetarium.

Planetarium equipment, circa 1953 [The Jerry Bywaters Collection, Southern Methodist University]

Planetarium equipment, circa 1953 [The Jerry Bywaters Collection, Southern Methodist University]

The planetarium’s first show, “A Trip to the Moon,” was held during the 1953 State Fair. The Model A-1 Spitz planetarium, with 24-foot dome, would go on to enthrall thousands of visitors—over 10,000 in the first six months—with shows such as “Star of Bethlehem,” “Skies over Dallas,” “Reasons for the Seasons,” “The Sun and Its Family,” “Seven Wonders of the Universe,” and “The Greatest Show Off Earth.”

Shows were scheduled for the public on weekends and for groups during the week, for the low price of 50 cents for adults and 25 cents for children and students. The State Fair was the most popular time for the planetarium, entertaining 4,000 people over 69 shows in 1954 and 5,665 people over 80 shows in 1955.

In early 1956, the planetarium was transferred to the Health Museum, which was later called the Science Place and is now closed.

Hillary Bober is the Archivist at the Dallas Museum of Art.

 

ARTifacts: Textile and Fine Arts Building

One hundred and five years ago, in April 1909, the Dallas Art Association (the parent organization of what is now the DMA) presented the City of Dallas with their collection and opened in a new permanent gallery space in the Textile and Fine Arts Building in Fair Park as the Dallas Free Public Art Gallery.

 

Textile and Fine Arts Building, Fair Park, c. 1909

Textile and Fine Arts Building, Fair Park, c. 1909

The DAA collection had been shown in the Art Room at the Dallas Public Library from 1903 to 1909 but was in need of larger quarters. Beginning with the opening of the new gallery on April 17, 1909, the collection’s hours were Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m., and entry was free.

Dallas Free Public Art Gallery in the Textile and Fine Arts Building, Fair Park, c. 1909-1929.

Dallas Free Public Art Gallery in the Textile and Fine Arts Building, Fair Park, c. 1909-1929

The collection remained on display in the Textile and Fine Arts Building for twenty years and was then relocated to the former Halaby Galleries space in the Majestic Theatre Building, opening April 30, 1929.

Hillary Bober is the digital archivist at the Dallas Museum of Art.

ARTifacts: Harwood Street Meets Sesame Street

Did you know—or remember—that a few special Sesame Street residents came to the DMA? Bert, Ernie and friends joined the celebration for the new downtown Museum by entertaining our youngest visitors on opening day, January 29, 1984.

Sesame Street characters at the DMA, 1984

Sesame Street characters at the DMA, 1984

Ernie at the DMA, 1984

Ernie at the DMA, 1984

Bert at the DMA, 1984

Bert at the DMA, 1984

Honkers at the DMA, 1984

Honker at the DMA, 1984

Hillary Bober is the digital archivist at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Choosing Favorites

Young men voting for their favorite work in the exhibition "Portrait of America," September 30-November 5, 1945 (Photograph from the Studio of Wm. Langley)

Young men voting for their favorite work in the exhibition Portrait of America, September 30-November 5, 1945 (Photograph from the Studio of Wm. Langley)

In 1945 the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts was the seventh venue for the 150-painting traveling exhibition Portrait of America, sponsored by “Artists for Victory” and the Pepsi-Cola Company. The museum invited Dallasites to vote for their favorite work in the exhibition. The winner of the vote was Gladys Rockmore Davis’s Noel with Violin; she was awarded $100 by the manager of the local Pepsi-Cola Company bottling plant.

The DMA is once again asking you to pick your favorite, this time in the Museum’s first Art Madness tournament, inspired by the NCAA Championship game, which will take place in North Texas this April. DMA Friends are currently determining the Sweet Sixteen by participating in the DMA Friends Love a Work of Art activity. Once we have the 16 works determined in late February, the public can vote for their favorites online. Stay tuned for more information on how you can help pick the first DMA Art Madness Champion!

Hillary Bober is the digital archivist at the DMA.


Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 685 other followers

Twitter Updates

Flickr Photo Stream

More Photos

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 685 other followers