Posts Tagged 'Dallas Museum of Art'

V.I.B. Visit to the DMA


Two week’s ago we had a special visitor at the DMA, the great godson of Gerald Murphy! The Museum’s education blog, DMA Canvas, shared his visit and snapped a few photos of 11-month-old Vance in front of his great godfather’s work Watch.

Gerald Murphy was described as “the progenitor of Pop Art” in a New York Times review of the exhibition Making it New, which the DMA presented in in 2008. His two works in the colelction serve as a precursuer to those works on view in International Pop, now open and on view through Janaury 17, 2016.

Originally posted on DMA Canvas:


We had a Very Important Baby visit the Museum today! Eleven-month old Vance Douglas Lancaster Van Daele took a stroll through the galleries this morning with his father Vance, and graciously agreed to strike a pose for us. Besides his adorable smile and cheerful personality, what makes baby Vance so very important? Well he just so happens to be the great godson of artist Gerald Murphy!


Baby Vance’s family first met Laura Donnelly, Murphy’s granddaughter, through Deborah Rothschild, curator of the critically acclaimed exhibition Making It New: The Art and Style of Sara and Gerald Murphy, which was on view at the DMA when I first started working here in 2008.


Our little celebrity wasn’t too concerned with famous names as we spent time in front of Murphy’s painting Watch. He solemnly gazed at the painting, then took off crawling around the gallery with delighted squeals. I like…

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Dallas Goes Pop

It’s been a busy, colorful week in the Museum’s Barrel Vault gallery. We have been putting the final touches on the nationally touring exhibition International Pop, which opens this Sunday, October 11, including the installation of León Ferrari’s The Western Christian Civilization (La civilización occidentaly cristiana) from 1965. This morning DFW press were given a sneak peek of the groundbreaking and critically acclaimed exhibition.  Here’s your behind-the-scenes look, and mark your calendars for Sunday.

30-Minute Dash: Emily Schiller

The design of the DMA provides several places for visitors to observe disparate forms of art within adjacent spaces. I find these vantage points to be the Museum’s most unexpected assets and my recommended route passes three of them.


Take the mid-Concourse stairs to the third-floor balcony. From this elevated perspective you’re able to recognize the curious pairing of sculptures on the ground level and left wall. William Wetmore Story’s Semiramis  follows the familiar tradition of depicting legendary figures in white marble. She reclines near the base of a 1930s Ceremonial pole (mbis) created by the Asmat people in the southwestern region of present-day New Guinea. These works arguably have little in common, and yet at the DMA they are neighbors, ripe for comparison and appreciation.

Next, proceed through the Japanese gallery on the Museum’s third level to the balcony that looks back onto your previous position. The expanse of artistic styles, periods, materials, and intentions gains a level of complexity with the presence of a cast bronze sculpture from the Meji period, Takenouchi no Sukune Meets the Dragon King of the Sea.

Emily Schiller is the Digital Collections Content Coordinator at the DMA.

Opening Night: Spirit and Matter

Tomorrow Spirit and Matter: Masterpieces from the Keir Collection of Islamic Art opens during our September fall block party Late Night. Huffington Post ranked it at #1 among “need to see” art shows this fall and it is a “Critic’s Pick” in The Dallas Morning News. This morning, exhibition curator and DMA Senior Advisor for Islamic Art Dr. Sabiha Al Khemir shared a sneak peek of the exhibition with national press.

Be among the first to see these intricately decorated objects spanning numerous centuries and continents tomorrow night and join Dr. Al Khemir for a talk on the works of art at 7:00 p.m.


Class of 2016

It’s time for us to welcome our 2015-2016 class of McDermott Interns to the DMA. Each year a new class joins the Museum for nine months in positions divided between the Museum’s curatorial and education departments. You will hear from each of the interns on Uncrated throughout their nine months at the DMA, but we thought we would share a few fun facts about this group before they delve into their internships.

Devon Hersch, the McDermott Intern for Asian Art, plays the piano and has been recording music in Austin of songs he wrote during college.

Jenny Wang, the McDermott Graduate Intern for Adult Programming and Arts & Letters Live, has no luck with earrings—she’s had her ears pierced twice in the same spot but the holes always close up.

Nolan Jimbo, the McDermott Intern for Contemporary Art, has never had queso dip (a problem he hopes the other interns will help rectify). He also still has three baby teeth.

Erin Piñon, the McDermott Graduate Intern for American Art, uses coconut oil as a cure-all product (similar to Windex in My Big Fat Greek Wedding).

Paulina Lopez, the McDermott Graduate Intern for Visitor Engagement, was the only girl in her town’s regional baseball league during the 6th grade.

Emily Wiskera, the McDermott Graduate Intern for Family and Access Teaching, has had the same pen pal for eleven years. They only communicate through cryptograms and have never met face to face!

Franny Brock, the Dedo and Barron Kidd McDermott Graduate Intern for European Art, won a snow-sculpting competition in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Whitney Sirois, the McDermott Graduate Intern for Gallery and Community Teaching, made a time capsule with friends in college, but the gravel was too dry to bury it so they hid the capsule in ceiling tiles on campus . . . along with the shovel.

Amanda Kramp, the McDermott Graduate Intern for Ancient American Art, loves planning, hosting, and attending themed dinner parties. This includes themed decorations, music, and food and drink. She even requests that guests don fancy or period specific dress relevant to the theme.

Learn more about the McDermott Internships on the DMA’s website; you can apply for your chance to be a 2016-2017 McDermott Intern in January.


Sarah Coffey is the Education Coordinator at the Dallas Museum of Art.

Precious Objects

Twenty-five works from the celebrated Rose-Asenbaum Collection of modern and contemporary jewelry are now on view, and included in free general admission, in the Museum’s Tower Gallery exhibition Form/Unformed: Design from 1960 to the Present. The collection includes over 700 pieces of modern studio jewelry created by more than 150 acclaimed artists from Europe and around the world. Take time to “ooh” and “ahh” over these magnificent bracelets, brooches, necklaces, and more.

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Painting a Passageway

Indian artist N S Harsha recently completed his first U.S. museum solo show, a mural commissioned by the DMA. This 120-foot wall painting is on view through February 21, 2016, in the Museum’s Concourse between the Barrel Vault and Fleischner Courtyard. Below is the completed project as well as the mural in progress. When asked about his feelings on his work being painted over and “lost” after the completion of the exhibition, Harsha replied, “The physicality disappears but the work is etched into the minds of people,” adding that he was happy to leave the space clean for the next artist.



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N S Harsha with press during installation, August 2015

Gavin Delahunty, Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art at the DMA, and N S Harsha speaking to the press during installation.

Gavin Delahunty, The Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art at the DMA, and N S Harsha speaking to the press during installation

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